Francis King
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Albert Francis King

$7,500.00

ALBERT FRANCIS KING (1864-1945)
Albert Francis King has been recognized as one of America's great 19th century artists. Born in 1854, King's parents had moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to flee Germany from religious persecution. King was largely self-taught, but did study under fellow Scalp Level School member Martin B. Leisser, a noted landscape artist. Scalp Level is an area near Johnstown, Pennsylvania, not far from Pittsburgh. The Scalp Level School was a loosely knit group of artists who trekked into the woods to capture the beauty of America’s countryside. But instead of leaving New York City to paint scenic views of the Hudson River Valley or the Catskills and Adirondack mountains, they left the smoky streets of Pittsburgh to paint sweeping landscapes near Johnston, Pennsylvania, and beyond. The most prominent member and founder of the Scalp Level School was George Hetzel. He was so taken with the beauty of the woodlands he witnessed there while on a fishing trip in 1866 that he convinced his colleagues, with whom he taught at the Pittsburgh School of Design, to accompany him on a painting outing the following summer.

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ALBERT FRANCIS KING (1864-1945)
Albert Francis King has been recognized as one of America’s great 19th century artists. Born in 1854, King’s parents had moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to flee Germany from religious persecution. King was largely self-taught, but did study under fellow Scalp Level School member Martin B. Leisser, a noted landscape artist. Scalp Level is an area near Johnstown, Pennsylvania, not far from Pittsburgh. The Scalp Level School was a loosely knit group of artists who trekked into the woods to capture the beauty of America’s countryside. But instead of leaving New York City to paint scenic views of the Hudson River Valley or the Catskills and Adirondack mountains, they left the smoky streets of Pittsburgh to paint sweeping landscapes near Johnston, Pennsylvania, and beyond. The most prominent member and founder of the Scalp Level School was George Hetzel. He was so taken with the beauty of the woodlands he witnessed there while on a fishing trip in 1866 that he convinced his colleagues, with whom he taught at the Pittsburgh School of Design, to accompany him on a painting outing the following summer. Groups of artists and students returned to the area with Hetzel more or less regularly under the then formalized name the Scalp Level School. Like the Hudson River School, America’s most beloved group of 19th-century landscape painters, prices for paintings by these artists are on the rise. King was a multi-talented painter, whose diverse works included landscapes, portraits and still-life. King was sought after as a portrait painter and painted many of the prominent citizens of Pittsburgh, including composer Stephen Foster, Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick. Many of his portraits hung in the Duquesne Club in Pittsburgh, which was founded in 1873 and has hosted several American presidents, including Ulysses S. Grant. King’s still-life compositions including, fruit (especially watermelons), vegetables and fish depicting meal preparation, followed in the style of Jean-Bapiste-Simeon Chardin, a great 18th century French still-life painter. King was a member of the Pittsburgh Art Society and the Pittsburgh Art Association. He has paintings on display at seven museums in the U.S., including the Oakland Museum of California, Southeastern Alleghenies Museum of Art and the Westmoreland Museum of American Art. King was featured in the August 2001, August 2006 and February 2009 issues of “American Art Review”. Except for a period of two years spent in Omaha, Nebraska, in the mid-1930s, King worked in Pittsburgh his entire life. A 1938 Pittsburgh Sun Telegraph interview notes: “Today, at 83, the Pittsburgh painter [King] is still one to whom many turn to for portrait work. His hand is just as steady, his ability to secure a likeness just as infallible.” This wonderful landscape by King exemplifies his work with the Scalp Level School. The painting is handwritten on the canvas verso with the season and location, Autumn, Pike County. This beautiful scenery in Pennsylvania is now considered part of the most western edge of the Greater New York area surrounding New York City. The oil on canvas measures 28″x20″, and 32″x34″ framed. King’s artwork has sold at auction internationally, including Christie’s and Sotheby’s, with prices reaching over 40,000 U.S.

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ALBERT FRANCIS KING (1864-1945)
Albert Francis King has been recognized as one of America’s great 19th century artists. Born in 1854, King’s parents had moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to flee Germany from religious persecution. King was largely self-taught, but did study under fellow Scalp Level School member Martin B. Leisser, a noted landscape artist. Scalp Level is an area near Johnstown, Pennsylvania, not far from Pittsburgh. The Scalp Level School was a loosely knit group of artists who trekked into the woods to capture the beauty of America’s countryside. But instead of leaving New York City to paint scenic views of the Hudson River Valley or the Catskills and Adirondack mountains, they left the smoky streets of Pittsburgh to paint sweeping landscapes near Johnston, Pennsylvania, and beyond. The most prominent member and founder of the Scalp Level School was George Hetzel. He was so taken with the beauty of the woodlands he witnessed there while on a fishing trip in 1866 that he convinced his colleagues, with whom he taught at the Pittsburgh School of Design, to accompany him on a painting outing the following summer. Groups of artists and students returned to the area with Hetzel more or less regularly under the then formalized name the Scalp Level School. Like the Hudson River School, America’s most beloved group of 19th-century landscape painters, prices for paintings by these artists are on the rise. King was a multi-talented painter, whose diverse works included landscapes, portraits and still-life. King was sought after as a portrait painter and painted many of the prominent citizens of Pittsburgh, including composer Stephen Foster, Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick. Many of his portraits hung in the Duquesne Club in Pittsburgh, which was founded in 1873 and has hosted several American presidents, including Ulysses S. Grant. King’s still-life compositions including, fruit (especially watermelons), vegetables and fish depicting meal preparation, followed in the style of Jean-Bapiste-Simeon Chardin, a great 18th century French still-life painter. King was a member of the Pittsburgh Art Society and the Pittsburgh Art Association. He has paintings on display at seven museums in the U.S., including the Oakland Museum of California, Southeastern Alleghenies Museum of Art and the Westmoreland Museum of American Art. King was featured in the August 2001, August 2006 and February 2009 issues of “American Art Review”. Except for a period of two years spent in Omaha, Nebraska, in the mid-1930s, King worked in Pittsburgh his entire life. A 1938 Pittsburgh Sun Telegraph interview notes: “Today, at 83, the Pittsburgh painter [King] is still one to whom many turn to for portrait work. His hand is just as steady, his ability to secure a likeness just as infallible.” This wonderful landscape by King exemplifies his work with the Scalp Level School. The painting is handwritten on the canvas verso with the season and location, Autumn, Pike County. This beautiful scenery in Pennsylvania is now considered part of the most western edge of the Greater New York area surrounding New York City. The oil on canvas measures 28″x20″, and 32″x34″ framed. King’s artwork has sold at auction internationally, including Christie’s and Sotheby’s, with prices reaching over 40,000 U.S.